Hello My Name Is...

Chad Compton
7th grade Language Arts

WP

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Daily Lesson
Objective:
By the end of this
lesson
the student will be
able to
effectively identify
nonfiction text
organization.

Standards to be
addressed:
7.6 The student will
read and demonstrate
comprehension of a
variety of nonfiction
texts.
c) Identify an author’s
organizational pattern
using textual clues,
such as transitional
words and phrases.
●        recognize
organizational pattern
to enhance
comprehension,
including: 
➢        chronological;
 
●         recognize
transitional words
 and
phrases authors
use to
signal organizational
patterns, including,
but not limited to:
➢         meanwhile
for chronological
 
Warm-up:                                       
Time: 5 minutes
QuickWrite: Have
students to make
a list of all the
disasters they have
heard about, what
we’ve learned from
them, and how we
could be better
prepared.
Introduction/
Instruction
(Teacher Actions):      
Time:  50 minutes
Discuss
chronological
order in detail with
students. Remind '
them that
chrono=time, 
logic=time, so
chronological is
events in
time order.
Read aloud
“Exploring the
Titanic” by
Robert T. Ballad.
After
reading and
discussing the story
the students will
create a
timeline and fill
in the information
from the story.
 
(English 7 Lesson 57
Instructional
Material 1)
Activity/Practice
(Student Actions):                                  
Time: 30 minutes
Timeline of events
activity from the
narrative
nonfiction, Exploring
the Titanic.
(English 7 Lesson 57
Activity 1)
Closing:                                                                                  
Time: 5 minutes
QuickWrite: What
can we learn
from this disaster,
the sinking of the
unsinkable
ship?

 
Resources:
Story can be found in
Holt McDougal
Literature
Grade 7 or
onlinehttp://www.xenia.
k12.oh.us/userfiles/251/
from%20Exploring
%20the%20Titanic%
20by%20Robert%20Ball
ard%20(eText).pdf

Parent Connection:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJJGh7YuemU




Daily Lesson Objective: By the end of this lesson the student will be able to effectively identify
nonfiction text organization.
 
Standards to be addressed:
7.6 The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of nonfiction texts.
c) Identify an author’s organizational pattern using textual clues, such as transitional words and phrases.
●        recognize organizational pattern to enhance comprehension, including: 
➢         enumeration or listing;
➢         process or sequential order
●         recognize transitional words and phrases authors use to signal organizational patterns,
including, but not limited to:
➢         first, three for enumeration or listing;  begins with, in order to for process. 
 
Warm-up:                                       
Time: 10 minutes
Organizational Pattern Notebook (English 7 Lesson 58 Activity 1 notebook) (English 7Lesson 58 Activity 1 pdf)
Introduction/Instruction (Teacher Actions):      
Time:  50 minutes
Discuss that sequence in order and process are text structures that organize the information in steps usually
explaining how to do something or how something happens. *how to make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.
Enumeration is information that is in number order and listing is simply a bulleted list.
Read aloud and discuss the text, Emergency Supply List (English 7 Lesson 58 Instructional Material 1)
Read aloud and discuss the text, making paper *ONLY the first page (English 7 Lesson 58 Instructional
Material 2)
Have students to highlight keywords/transitional words.
Activity/Practice (Student Actions):                                  
Time: 25 minutes
Students will create a list (this can be a store list, a bucket list, or whatever you want them to create.) Students
will also create a sequence in order or process text. (How to change the oil or How to bake a cake.)
Closing:                                                                                  
Time: 5 minutes
As a group write the process of how to exit the building during a fire drill.
Resources:
 
Parent Connection:


Daily Lesson Objective: By the end of this lesson the student will be able to effectively identify nonfiction text
organization.
 
Standards to be addressed:
7.6 The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of nonfiction texts.
c) Identify an author’s organizational pattern using textual clues, such as transitional words and phrases.
●        recognize organizational pattern to enhance comprehension, including: 
➢          concept/definition;
 
●         recognize transitional words and phrases authors use to signal organizational patterns,
including, but not limited to:
➢         refers to, thus for concept/definition
 
Warm-up:                                       
Time: 15 minutes
Patterns of Organizational Structure (English 7 Lesson 59 Activity 1)
Introduction/Instruction (Teacher Actions):      
Time:  10 minutes
Discuss with students that concept and definition text structure is when the writer introduces an idea and
explains what it is. Example: Golden Eagles are powerful raptors with large dark brown bodies and small heads
with golden crowns.
Transition words generally used: is, for example, involves, can be, defined, an example, for instance, in fact,
also, contain, make up
Activity/Practice (Student Actions):                                  
Time: 60 minutes
Students will need access to computer or reference books. Students will choose a topic *ex: the golden eagle.
Students will research their topic then write a short essay using the concept/definition text structure. Students
will need to be sure to use transitional words/phrases  to complete the activity successfully.
Closing:                                                                                  
Time: 5 minutes
Students will share their writing with a classmate.
Resources:
Parent Connection:
Daily Lesson
Objective: By
the end of this
lesson the
student will be
able to effectively
identify the
author’s purpose.
 
Standards to
be addressed:
7.6 The
student will
read and
demonstrate
comprehension
of a variety of
nonfiction texts.
f) Identify the
source,
viewpoint,
and purpose
of texts. 
g) Describe
how word choice
and language
structure convey
an author’s
viewpoint.
 recognize
an author’s
purpose:  to
entertain;  to
inform; and 
to persuade.
 
Warm-up:                                       
Time: 5
minutes
Ask students
why authors
write? Have
them write
down their
ideas.
 
Introduction/
Instruction
(Teacher Actions):      
Time:  35 minutes
 
Begin by
assessing the
students’ prior
knowledge. Why
do they think
the author would
have a
purpose for
writing a story
and/or article?
What kind of
questions do
they ask
themselves while
reading to
figure out
the purpose?
What does the
author’s purpose
mean?
• Persuade: to
convince the
reader of a
certain point
of view
• Inform: to
teach or give
information to
the reader
• En t e rt a i n :
to hold the
attention of
the reader
through
enjoyment
(English 7
Lesson 60
Instructional
Material 1)
 
Cut out titles
of different
articles from
a newspaper.
Hand each
group a few
titles and ask
them to
display their
titles under the
correct heading
- persuade,
inform, and
entertain. As
a group,
read each title
aloud and ask
the students
what the
author’s purpose
is. Have the
group explain
what word
and/or phrases
support their
choice for the
author’s purpose.
Read aloud
the story, The
House by Laurie
Henry. (English7
Lesson 60
Instructional
Material 2)
Now that the
students have
the descriptive
story in their
mind they will
complete an
author’s purpose
activity in small
groups.
 
Activity/Practice
(Student Actions):                                  
Time: 40 minutes
Divide class
into small groups.
Each group will
be given chart
paper, and an
assignment to
complete. They
must not discuss
with other groups
their author’s
purpose.
(English 7
Lesson 60
Activity 1)

Students will
present to the
class and students
will determine
which purpose
the author had
written. 
Closing:                                                                                  
Time: 10
minutes
Author’s
Purpose
Practice.
Students will
read the
descriptions
of each item
and determine
the author’s
main purpose
(to entertain,
persuade, or
inform). Then, in
a sentence
or two, explain
your answer.
(English 7
Lesson60
Activity 2)
 
Parent Connection:
https://www.
youtube.com/watch?v=F0XziDwFE-g

Daily Lesson
Objective:
By the end
of this lesson
the student will
be able to
effectively
identify the
author’s viewpoint.
 
Standards to be
addressed:
7.6 The student
will read and
demonstrate
comprehension
of a variety of
nonfiction texts.
f) Identify the source, viewpoint, and purpose of texts.
 g) Describe how
word choice and
language structure
convey an author’s
viewpoint.
 analyze how two
or more authors
writing about the
same topic shape
their presentations
or viewpoints of key
information using
facts, opinions, and
reasoning.
 
Warm-up:                                       
Time: 5 minutes
Ask students to
write down what
they think an
author’s viewpoint
is and why it’s
important.
 
Introduction/
Instruction
(Teacher Actions):      
Time:  40 minutes
Discuss author’s
viewpoint and
project powerpoint
on smartboard.
(English 7
Lesson 61
Instructional
Material 1)
Practice author’s
viewpoint skill
using the webpage
below.
http://www.study
zone.org/testprep/
ela4/o/authorsview
pointl.cfm
 
Activity/Practice
(Student Actions):                                  
Time: 40 minutes
Students will need
computers to
complete an
online activity
practicing author’s
viewpoint.
http://www.iq.
poquoson.org/
5langarts/view.htm
Practice author’s
viewpoint
(English 7
Lesson 61 Activity 1)
Closing:                                                                                  
Time: 5 minutes
Students will
correct 5 sentences
for grammar
mistakes. 
Resources:
http://downloads.
hmlt.hmco.com/
EdSchool/
LMS4Resources/
DR4_Print_
Activities/Unit_22/
You
r-Turn_Activities/
DR4_U22_Comp-
Skill_Your-Turn.pdf
 
http://www.
fergusonhs.org/
ourpages/auto/
2014/2/24/73048671/
Analyze%20Using%
20Author
s%20Purpose%20
March%203-7.pdf
Parent Connection:



To view the Parent Connection or other resources in blue or red click on the hyperlink.